Check out How UK Health Tax Law is Hurting Foreign Nurses, Separating Families

“Mr Ken from Kenya earns £1,800 a month after tax. But, once the bills and rent have been paid, he is left with only £500.”
-Indian, Filipino, Nigerian, Zimbabwean and Pakistani Nurses are top non EU nurses in UK

When a Kenyan nurse took up a job in the UK a few years ago, he felt his family’s future had been secured.

But now the distraught father-of-three is struggling financially to reunite his family.

Ken, not his real name, lives with his wife and daughter.
But his twin children, a boy and a girl, remain in Kenya where they live with relatives.

That’s because Ken is unable to raise enough money to cover a British health tax, known as the immigration health surcharge (IHS).

‘Struggling to stay afloat’

Migrant workers coming to the UK from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) and their dependents have to a pay an annual fee of £200 ($268) each.

Ken is also required to have £2,185 in his account for three months before he can apply to bring his twins into the country – on top of the £400 he will need for their health tax.

“It’s very difficult to explain to them when they ask me when they will join me here.

“Ideally, every parent would love to be with all their children.”

Top five nationalities of non-EEA NHS staff in England

Indian – 18,348
Filipino- 15,391
Nigerian – 5,405
Zimbabwean – 3,899
Pakistani – 3,375

One in eight National Health Service (NHS) England staff are not British nationals, and people from a total of 201 foreign nationalities work for NHS England.
Source: House of Commons Library

The time difference and the nature of his job also make it difficult for him to give the twins the attention they need.

“Sometimes when you’re at work, they call and you cannot speak with them as you’d love to, since you’re really busy,” he says.

The health surcharge was introduced in 2015 to boost funding for the National Health Service (NHS) and as a way to discourage health tourism.

Later this year, the annual charge is to be doubled from £200 to £400, with the discounted rate for students set to increase from £150 to £300.

If Ken does manage to bring his twins over to the UK, the annual health tax for the whole family in future will total £2,000.

He earns £1,800 a month after tax. But, once the bills and rent have been paid, he is left with only £500.

“The £500 is for food, transport and other needs, and can’t satisfy my children’s needs,” says Ken.

“The IHS is causing families to separate and I don’t feel we’re being treated fairly,” he says.

“I’m struggling to keep afloat.”

‘Morally questionable’

At the annual conference for the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) last month, union members unanimously voted to demand that the government waive the fee on work permits for nurses and their dependents.

The union’s resolution said it was “morally questionable” for foreign nurses “to pay the health surcharge, given that they pay national insurance and income taxes, as well as providing a vital service to the public”.

For the nurses’ union, recruiting and retaining qualified nurses is a major issue.

The NHS faced a shortage of nearly 88,000 workers between July and September 2017 in England alone, statistics from NHS Digital show.

“Nursing staff are increasingly caring for sicker patients with multiple long-term conditions,” says Janet Davies, general secretary of the RCN.

“This demands safe staffing levels and the right specialist skills. Yet as patients get sicker, the number of nurses continues to decline, due to years of cost-cutting and poor workforce planning.”

The government needs to address these shortages, especially as the UK has an ageing population, she says.
A patient’s ability to recover is determined by the number of nurses on duty, she adds.

A double tax?

A Home Office spokesperson reiterated that the government was aware of the “contribution” made by international professionals “to the UK and to our health service”.

But it said the surcharge offered access to healthcare that was “far more comprehensive and at a much lower cost than many other countries”.

“The income generated goes directly to NHS services, helping to protect and sustain our world-class healthcare system for everyone who uses it,” the spokesperson said.

But Ken says foreign nurses already pay income tax in the UK.

“I think it’s an issue of double taxation, because once you’ve paid taxes you should enjoy these services,” he says.

“You work so hard, do the nights and heavy 12-hour shifts helping the sick, but you end up feeling not supported and you can’t help yourself.”

Ken is considering leaving the UK if he is not able to raise the funds to bring over his twins, as the situation is causing him and his family a lot of stress.

“I have thought of going to other countries – Canada or maybe Australia – and starting the whole application afresh with everybody on board.”

Source : BBC Report

Angola: Luanda Nurses Go On Strike Over Govt Failure to Honour 2012 Agreements

Nurses Union instructed Monday the class in the public hospitals in Luanda to halt work, as part of the general strike called on May 31st.

According to the secretary of the Union, António Kileba, the strike is being observed in all Luanda-based hospitals.

With the exception of National hospitals such as those of Américo Boavida, Josina Machel, Luanda Sanatorium and Neves Bendinha.

“This strike is based on the demands that we have been submitting since 2012, and we reached a conclusion that the employer failed to meet them,” he said.

Despite the decision, a meeting was held Monday among the Union, the Provincial Health Department and the Provincial Government of Luanda, to evaluate the aspects contained in book submitted to the competent body in 2012.

In its Monday round, Angop learned that until Monday at 4:00 p.m., nurses in some provincial hospitals such as Augusto Ngangula Maternity, Neves Bendinha (specialised in treatment of burns) are working fully.

Whereas, Rangel Health Center is operating on duty system
Source : ANGOP.

2018 Edinburgh Online Global Health Scholarships For Africans

The University’s Global Health Academy has been
awarded 5 fully funded studentships across five online
Masters programmes within the domain of Global
Health.

Award
The scholarship includes full tuition fee and resources to enhance student participation, access and research
skills. This includes participation in a summer school;
contribution towards student costs of internet access &
printing (journal articles, etc); and a contribution to
MSc project costs (materials, travel, etc).

The scholarships will be awarded to a candidate who is
accepted for admission on to an eligible programme
and who is a citizen of and resident in one of the
following developing Commonwealth countries:
Bangladesh
Cameroon
The Gambia
Ghana
Guyana
India
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Mozambique
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa
Sierra Leone
Solomon Islands
Sri Lanka
Swaziland
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vanuatu
Zambia

Eligible programmes:
MSc Clinical Education
MSc Family Medicine
MSc Global Challenges
MSc Paediatric Emergency Medicine
eMPH Public Health

Students enrolled on these eligible Masters
programmes become members of the Global Health
Academy community which encourages both intra- and
inter-disciplinary engagement and communication.

The Global Health Academy initiative cuts across the
traditional vertical health structures moving to novel
integrated health systems training. Our aim is to
promote a global community of practice where
students can access multiple strands of knowledge
from many different experts to tackle some of the
biggest challenges in the 21st century.

For example, non-communicable diseases are changing
the face of African, Asian and Latin American health
and healthcare and require not just disease specialists
but experts in logistics, in training and policy and in
technologies especially, e- and m-health, in order to
create stronger community health. Students taking
these courses find them rewarding in the opportunity
they present to engage with professionals from
industry, medicine, policy and research.

For more information and application, please click here
ukaid.org/2018/06/11/edinburgh-online-global-health-scholarships/

World Health Organization (WHO) Certifies Paraguay Malaria-Free

The World Health Organization (WHO) today certified Paraguay as having eliminated malaria, the first country in the Americas to be granted this status since Cuba in 1973.

“It gives me great pleasure today to certify that Paraguay is officially free of malaria,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director General, in a recorded statement. “Success stories like Paraguay’s show what is possible. If malaria can be eliminated in one country, it can be eliminated in all countries.”

WHO Director-General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus commended Paraguay on its achievement and briefly outlines the success factors that enabled the country to become malaria-free.

In 2016, WHO identified Paraguay as one of 21 countries with the potential to eliminate malaria by 2020. Through the “E-2020 initiative,” WHO is supporting these countries as they scale up activities to become malaria-free. Other E-2020 countries in the Americas include Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico and Suriname.

“I take pride in saying that PAHO has accompanied Paraguay in the crusade of malaria elimination since the beginning,” said Dr Carissa F Etienne, Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), WHO regional office for the Americas. “This is a powerful reminder for the region of what can be achieved when countries are focused on an important goal, and remain vigilant after achieving that goal. We are hopeful that other countries will soon join Paraguay in eliminating malaria”.

Achieving malaria-free status in Paraguay

From 1950 to 2011, Paraguay systematically developed policies and programmes to control and eliminate malaria, a significant public health challenge for a country that reported more than 80 000 cases of the disease in the 1940s. As a result, Paraguay registered its last case of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 1995, and P. vivax malaria in 2011.

A five-year plan to consolidate the gains, prevent re-establishment of transmission and prepare for elimination certification was launched in 2011. Activities focused on robust case management, engagement with communities, and education to make people more aware of ways to prevent malaria transmission, and about diagnosis and treatment options.

“Receiving this certification is recognition of more than five decades of hard work in Paraguay, both on the part of public sector workers, as well as the community itself, who have collaborated time and time again in order to achieve the elimination of malaria,” said Dr Carlos Ignacio Morínigo, Minister of Health of Paraguay. “Reaching this goal also implies that we must now face the challenge of maintaining it. Therefore, Paraguay has put in place a solid surveillance and response system in order to prevent the re-establishment of malaria.”

In 2016, in the next phase of the elimination drive, the Ministry of Health launched a three-year initiative to build Paraguay’s front-line health workers’ skills. Backed by The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the country strengthened its capacity to prevent disease, identify suspected malaria cases, accurately diagnose malaria and provide prompt treatment – key strategies to tackle the on-going threat of malaria importation from endemic countries elsewhere in the Americas and sub-Saharan Africa.

“Paraguay’s success demonstrates the importance of investing in robust, sustainable systems for health, and I’m very pleased that the Global Fund supported this achievement,” said Peter Sands, Executive Director of the Global Fund. “We need to remain vigilant and prevent resurgence, but we also need to celebrate this victory.”

In April 2018, the independent Malaria Elimination Certification Panel concluded that Paraguay had interrupted indigenous malaria transmission for the requisite 3 years and had the capacity to prevent the re-establishment of transmission. The Panel recommended the WHO Director-General certify the country malaria-free.

They highlighted factors such as the quality and coverage of health services, including malaria awareness among front-line health workers, the universal availability of free medical treatment, and a strong malaria surveillance system.

Between 1960 and 1973, seven countries and territories from the Americas were certified malaria-free: Cuba, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, and the northern part of Venezuela. In the Region of the Americas, malaria cases declined by 62%, and malaria-related deaths decreased by 61% between 2000 and 2015. However, the rise of malaria cases reported in several countries in 2016 and 2017 show that major challenges remain, including the diagnosis, treatment, and investigation of malaria cases, particularly in remote areas.

Ogun State School of Midwifery 2018/2019 Admission Form on Sale

This is to inform the General public of the sale of 2018/2019 session admission form into Ogun State Schools of Midwifery.

Applicants must be registered female nurses with valid license or notification of result issued by Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria (NMCN)

Interested candidates should contact room 117 of the Ministry of Health for the collection of registration forms.

Application form which is already on sale will close on Friday 29th June, 2018 while the examination will hold on Saturday 7th July, 2018 at the School of Nursing and Midwifery Complex, Idi-Aba, Abeokuta at 8:00am prompt

Please note, the examination will be paper-Based and no online registration is required.

ANNOUNCER
Dr. Nafiu Aigoro
Permanent Secretary Ministry of Health

Check out How UK Health Tax Law is Hurting Foreign Nurses, Separating Families

“Mr Ken from Kenya earns £1,800 a month after tax. But, once the bills and rent have been paid, he is left with only £500.”
-Indian, Filipino, Nigerian, Zimbabwean and Pakistani Nurses are top non EU nurses in UK

When a Kenyan nurse took up a job in the UK a few years ago, he felt his family’s future had been secured.

But now the distraught father-of-three is struggling financially to reunite his family.

Ken, not his real name, lives with his wife and daughter.
But his twin children, a boy and a girl, remain in Kenya where they live with relatives.

That’s because Ken is unable to raise enough money to cover a British health tax, known as the immigration health surcharge (IHS).

‘Struggling to stay afloat’

Migrant workers coming to the UK from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) and their dependents have to a pay an annual fee of £200 ($268) each.

Ken is also required to have £2,185 in his account for three months before he can apply to bring his twins into the country – on top of the £400 he will need for their health tax.

“It’s very difficult to explain to them when they ask me when they will join me here.

“Ideally, every parent would love to be with all their children.”

Top five nationalities of non-EEA NHS staff in England
Indian – 18,348
Filipino- 15,391
Nigerian – 5,405
Zimbabwean – 3,899
Pakistani – 3,375

One in eight National Health Service (NHS) England staff are not British nationals, and people from a total of 201 foreign nationalities work for NHS England.
Source: House of Commons Library

The time difference and the nature of his job also make it difficult for him to give the twins the attention they need.

“Sometimes when you’re at work, they call and you cannot speak with them as you’d love to, since you’re really busy,” he says.

The health surcharge was introduced in 2015 to boost funding for the National Health Service (NHS) and as a way to discourage health tourism.

Later this year, the annual charge is to be doubled from £200 to £400, with the discounted rate for students set to increase from £150 to £300.

If Ken does manage to bring his twins over to the UK, the annual health tax for the whole family in future will total £2,000.

He earns £1,800 a month after tax. But, once the bills and rent have been paid, he is left with only £500.

“The £500 is for food, transport and other needs, and can’t satisfy my children’s needs,” says Ken.

“The IHS is causing families to separate and I don’t feel we’re being treated fairly,” he says.

“I’m struggling to keep afloat.”

‘Morally questionable’
At the annual conference for the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) last month, union members unanimously voted to demand that the government waive the fee on work permits for nurses and their dependents.

The union’s resolution said it was “morally questionable” for foreign nurses “to pay the health surcharge, given that they pay national insurance and income taxes, as well as providing a vital service to the public”.

For the nurses’ union, recruiting and retaining qualified nurses is a major issue.

The NHS faced a shortage of nearly 88,000 workers between July and September 2017 in England alone, statistics from NHS Digital show.

“Nursing staff are increasingly caring for sicker patients with multiple long-term conditions,” says Janet Davies, general secretary of the RCN.

“This demands safe staffing levels and the right specialist skills. Yet as patients get sicker, the number of nurses continues to decline, due to years of cost-cutting and poor workforce planning.”

The government needs to address these shortages, especially as the UK has an ageing population, she says.
A patient’s ability to recover is determined by the number of nurses on duty, she adds.

A double tax?
A Home Office spokesperson reiterated that the government was aware of the “contribution” made by international professionals “to the UK and to our health service”.

But it said the surcharge offered access to healthcare that was “far more comprehensive and at a much lower cost than many other countries”.

“The income generated goes directly to NHS services, helping to protect and sustain our world-class healthcare system for everyone who uses it,” the spokesperson said.

But Ken says foreign nurses already pay income tax in the UK.

“I think it’s an issue of double taxation, because once you’ve paid taxes you should enjoy these services,” he says.

“You work so hard, do the nights and heavy 12-hour shifts helping the sick, but you end up feeling not supported and you can’t help yourself.”

Ken is considering leaving the UK if he is not able to raise the funds to bring over his twins, as the situation is causing him and his family a lot of stress.

“I have thought of going to other countries – Canada or maybe Australia – and starting the whole application afresh with everybody on board.”

Source : BBC Report

Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital 2018 Employment Interview Update

OAUTH
11th -14th June 2018.

The complete list is in their office.

Touching Essay About The Life Of A Nurse To Be Made Into A Drama

“I’m A Nurse, I’m A Person” (working title), the beautiful but sad essay about the life of nurses, will be made into a drama.

A source from production company Raon IT said that they recently secured the rights to “I’m A Nurse, I’m A Person” and are planning to start the production of the drama with the goal of airing it in the second half of next year.

Published in April, “I’m A Nurse, I’m A Person” contains the ardent confessions and courageous voice of a nurse who tirelessly worked and took care of patients in the Surgical Intensive Unit for 21 years and 2 months.

Author Kim Hyun Ah is the writer of “A Nurse’s Letter,” which moved many Korean citizens during the 2015 MERS outbreak, and went on to receive the “Nurse of the Year Award” in 2016.

This essay has received positive reviews for its candid descriptions of the strict workplace that doesn’t allow a single mistake, and the important role and responsibility of nurses who take care of patients’ safety and citizens’ health in poor working conditions.

The production of this drama is bound to attract lots of attention as the human rights and better treatment of nurses were a hot social issue recently. Unlike past medical dramas where doctors were the focus of the storyline, “I’m A Nurse, I’m A Person” will be a meaningful drama that makes nurses its main characters.

Park Kyung Soo, the CEO of the production company, said, “We’re trying to tell a different story about nurses that’s real and not distorted. I think the story about nurses who could be our family, friend, and colleague can resonate and move viewers. We’re planning to tell a drama with a new perspective on nurses, their reality, and some dramatic fun, so please look forward to it.”

“I’m A Nurse, I’m A Person” will be written by the original author Kim Hyun Ah and directed by Kang Chul Woo of “1% of Anything” and upcoming drama “So I Married An Anti-Fan.” Director Kang Chul Woo was also the winner of the 2017 Cable Broadcasting Daesang for the New Media Category.

Source (1)

Court Remand Nurse Who Treated Late Senator Adeleke in Prison for Murder

AN Osun State High court, sitting in Ede, on Friday ordered that a nurse, identified as Alfred Aderibigbe, who treated Late Senator Isiaka Adeleke shortly before he died on the 23rd of April, 2017 be remanded in prison custody.

This was contained in a press statement signed by the information officer in the Osun State Ministry of Justice, Mr Opeyemi Bello, which was made available to the TribuneOnline in Osogbo on Sunday.

It is recalled that Aderibigbe was indicted last year by a coroner inquest constituted by Governor Rauf Aregbesola’s administration to investigate the circumstances and cause of the death Adeleke, who until his demise represented Osun West Senatorial District in the National Assembly.

The coroner headed by Magistrate Olusegun Ayilara had found the nurse culpable for allegedly administering an overdose of analgesic tablets and intravenous injections on the late Senator.

Ayilara had at the conclusion of the inquest recommended Aderibigbe for prosecution having established that he administered drug overdose on the senator, thus culminating in his death. During his cross-examination, he had argued that the drugs administered on Adeleke were given to him by the deceased.

Testifying before the coroner, the consultant pathologist, who carried out an autopsy on Adeleke said his death was as a result drug overdose.

However, according to the statement, the accused nurse, on Friday pleaded not guilty to one count of murder preferred against him, just as his defence counsel, Barrister Soji Oyetayo informed the court of a bail application already filed before the court on behalf of his client.

But, the acting Solicitor General and Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Justice, Mr Dapo Adeniji opposed the bail application, describing it as premature, stressing that the accused was not in custody when the application was filed.

Presiding Justice Ayo Adebiyi ordered that the accused nurse should be remanded at Ilesa prison till 29th June when the case would come up for hearing.

Source: Nigeria Tribune

Staten Island University Hospital nurses to rally on Sunday

Dozens of off-duty nurses are expected to take part in “Safe Staffing Day of Action” on Sunday at noon outside Staten Island University Hospital in Ocean Breeze.

The nurses, who are members of the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA), are calling on lawmakers in Albany to pass the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act. NYSNA nurses are fighting to increase staffing in units they say are understaffed.

“Ask any nurse, and they will tell stories of having to care for 10, 11, 12 patients at a time, and for some nurses that number is even higher,” said Maddalena Spero, recovery room registered nurse, NYSNA.

“Nurses don’t have the ability to hold a patient’s hand, comfort a family member, or take a few minute break. The Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act guarantees professional RN [registered nurse] staffing levels at all New York hospitals  — one standard of quality care for our patients. Not only does it produce better outcomes for patients, but national studies actually prove that safe staffing is financially helpful to hospitals,” she added.

According to NYSNA the Safe Staffing for Quality Care Act will do the following:

  • Make sure there are enough nurses at the bedside of patients.
  • Set a cap on the number of patients a nurse is responsible for at any given time.
  • Establish safe nurse-to-patient ratios in all of New York Hospitals.
  • Require hospitals to staff nurses in the specific unit for which they are trained.
  • Require hospitals to be more transparent.

PROTESTS OF ASSIGNMENT

NYSNA said its nurses fill out “Protests of Assignment” (POA) when care issues arise and share the POAs with hospital management.

At Staten Island University Hospital alone, 1,815 POAs have been filed over the last three years that include complaints from over 8,600 nurses, according to NYSNA.

“In 2017, at hospitals where our nurses provide care, tens of thousands of nurses signed POAs and the vast majority of them pertained to understaffing. From 2015 to 2017, in hospitals serviced by NYSNA nurses, over 69,000 POAs were submitted with signatures from over 280,000 nurses. More than 80 percent of those were because of safe staffing issues,” said NYSNA in a written statement to the Advance.

NYSNA represents more than 1,100 nurses employed at Staten Island University Hospital, Ocean Breeze. Nurses at the Price’s Bay site are represented by a different union.

HOSPITAL RESPONSE

Staten Island University Hospital issued the following statement to the Advance about Sunday’s rally: “While NYSNA’s social media posts, advertisements and demonstrations like the one planned for tomorrow at Staten Island University Hospital continue to claim that safe staffing is at the root of its contract dispute, it’s now clear that the union is motivated purely by a desire to further supplement the generous retirement health benefits provided to its 1,200 members at Staten Island University Hospital’s north site.”

The hospital said in the statement that all of Northwell Health’s investments in nurse hiring are based on “legitimate staffing needs, not mandated quotas like those advocated by NYSNA.”

“The leadership of Staten Island University Hospital has always been committed to patient safety – a commitment that will never waver. In fact, as the needs of our patients have changed over the years, we have added staff and continually review the hospital’s staffing needs, taking input from our registered nurses, medical staff and other employees, ” said the hospital.

NYSNA nurses at Staten Island University Hospital also recently voted to strike over contract disagreements.

In reference to that dispute, the hospital said: “During labor negotiations last week, Staten Island University Hospital made a very generous ‘last, best and final offer’ that addresses the concerns of nurses, including three percent annual wage increases over the next three years, with the first increase retroactive to March 1, 2018.”

Source: Silive.com