University of Lagos Distance Learning Institute (DLI) on the 2018/2019 Residential Programme Notice

The Distance Learning (DLI) Residential Programme for 2018/2019 academic session has been scheduled as follows:

ARRIVAL OF DLI STUDENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMME

2018/2019 DLI Residential Programme will commence from Monday, 18th November, 2019 and ends on Sunday, 29th December, 2019.

All DLI Students are expected to complete their course registration for the 2018/2019 session on or before Friday, November 8, 2019. Upon completion of the course registration, the ‘Hostel Application Button’ will be enabled for allocation of hostel bedspace. Upon resumption, students are expected to report at the hostel with the print-out of the accommodation slip between Tuesday, 12th November, 2019 for years 3 —6, and Tuesday, 3rd December, 2019 for years 1 & 2.

Distance Learning Institute

Each student should report in his/her allocated Hall of Residence with the following documents:

  1. Receipt of payment of full service charge for the current session
  2. Two copies of Online printed Accommodation Slip.
  3. Evidence of registration with the University Medical Centre.
  1. Sunday, 17th November, 2019 – Years 3 – 6 students move into Halls of Residence
  2. Monday, 18th November to Saturday, 23rd November, 2019-Years 3 – 6, Lecture mop up
  3. Monday, 25th November; 2019 – Examination commences for Years 3 — 6 students
  4. Saturday, 7th December, 2019 – Examination ends for Years 3 — 6 students
  5. Sunday, 8th December, 2019 – Years 3 – 6 students vacate Halls of Residence
  6. Sunday, 8th December; 2019 – Years 1 & 2 students move into Halls of Residence
  7. Monday, 9th December to Saturday, 14th December, 2019 – Years 1 & 2, Lecture mop up
  8. Monday, 16th December, 2019 – Examination commences for Years 1 & 2 students
  9. Saturday, 28th December, 2019 – Examination ends for Years 1 & 2 students
  10. Sunday, 29th December; 2019 – Years 1 & 2 students vacate Halls of Residence and end of Residential Programme

OTHER EXAMINATION REQUIREMENTS

  • Returning students are to complete payment of fees on or before Friday, November 1, 2019.
  • New students are to complete payment of fees on or before Wednesday, October 30, 2019.
  • Registration for courses for Years 1 — 6 students ends on Monday, November 11, 2019.
  • Students are required to come to the examination centre with one (1) recent passport photograph for each of the registered courses. The passport photographs must be the same used to register for the current academic session.
  • Examination docket would be enabled for printing as from Monday,18th November, 2019.
  • Final year Project defence will commence (for those who have completed registration) from Monday, 9th December to Saturday, 14th December, 2019.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Note that ONLY students of the Institute who are fully registered will be allowed to write examination. Unregistered students who sit for the examination will have their results nullified.

GENERAL INFORMATION

  1. Students are advised to visit DLI website for the Examination Time-Table.
  2. Students are encouraged to leave their cars at the hall of residence allocated to them during the Residential Programme. The DLI and its axis has no provision for students to park their vehicles.

SPECIAL PLEA TO EMPLOYERS

THE DISTANCE LEARNING INSTITUTE (DLI) MANAGEMENT APPEALS TO EMPLOYERS TO KINDLY RELEASE THEIR RESPECTIVE EMPLOYEES WHO ARE DLI STUDENTS. THIS IS TO ENABLE THEM PARTICIPATE IN THE FORTH-COMING RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMME, DURING WHICH THE 2018/2019 SESSIONAL EXAMINATION WILL BE CONDUCTED.

RESIDENTIAL CALENDAR OF EVENTS FOR 2018/2019 SESSION

YEARS 3 TO 6 (NOVEMBER – DECEMBER, 2019)

S/N DAY DATE PROGRAMME
1 Sunday 17th November,2019 Years 3 to 6 students move into the Halls of Residence
2 Monday to Saturday 18th November to 23rd November, 2019 (i) Revision period (ii) Years 3-6 to collect identification cards
3 Monday 25th November, 2019 Examination commences for Years 3-6
4 Saturday 7th December, 2019 Examination ends for Years 3-6
5 Sunday 8th December, 2019 Students vacate the Halls of Residence


YEARS 1 AND 2 (DECEMBER, 2019)

S/N DAY DATE PROGRAMME
1 Sunday 8th December,2019 Years 1 & 2 students move into the Halls of Residence
2 Monday to Saturday 9th to 14th December, 2019 (i) Revision period (ii) Years 1& 2 to collect identification cards
3 Monday 16th December, 2019 Examination commences for Years 1 &2
4 Saturday 28th December, 2019 Examination ends for Years 1 &2
5 Sunday 29th December, 2019 Students vacate the Halls of Residence

NO EXAMINATION ON 24TH, 25Th AND 26TH DECEMBER,2019

Oladejo Azeez, Esq

Registrar and Security to Council

DOCUMENTATION AS AN ESSENTIAL TOOL THAT PROTECTS THE NURSE AGAINST ETHICOLEGAL CONSEQUENCES

Documentation is considered as a vital communication tool among healthcare professionals.

Bad documentation can make a good nursing look bad and can make a bad nursing look even worse.

We all appreciate the fact that proper documentation is not just an indispensable tool for effective and efficient nursing care, but also a safeguard against ethicolegal infringements that the nurse may face in the course of discharging his/her nursing duties.
But due to alot of factors especially in Nigeria today, nurses tend to only pay attention on the cumbersome job at hand, giving their all to ensure that the task is accomplished and barely paying the needed attention to their documentation, despite actually performing their work judiciously, not acknowledging the basic fact that not documenting your work is as bad as not doing the work.

Among such factors leading to the failure of documentation among nurses include:
1. Poor staffing
2. Work overload
3. Ambiguous working environment
4. Lack of adequate equipment
5. Lack of proper orientation
6. Lack of existing institutional policies and guidelines on documentation

Nursing documentation is an integral part of clinical documentation and is a fundamental
nursing responsibility, with professional, legal and financial ramifications to both the nurse as well as the hospital.

Good documentation ensures continuity of care, furnishes legal evidence of the process of care and supports evaluation of patient care.

Nurses must balance clinical documentation with respect to legal imperatives. Accurate and complete documentation of client’s symptoms and observations is critical to proper treatment and management. Entries documented on a client’s clinical record are a legal and permanent document.

Definition
Nursing documentation is any written or electronically generated information that
describes the care or service provided to a particular client or group of clients. Through
documentation, nurses communicate to other healthcare professionals their observations,
decisions, actions and outcomes of care.

Documentation is an accurate account of what occurred and when it occurred.

Principles
In the process of documentation, the nurse needs to consider the following:
1. Enforce local policies and procedures or protocols of documentation at practice setting and that nurse follows these at all times.
2. Ensure clear, concise, accurate, complete, objective, legible and timely documentation to fulfil both clinical and legal imperatives.
3. Exercise professional judgment and apply knowledge and skills in the given situation.

Objectives of Nursing documentation
1. To show evidence of the provision of quality nursing care
2. Facilitates the advancement of efficient and effective health service programmes
3. To create a legal record of nursing services, treatments and communication provided to patients

Responsibilities of the nurse
1. The nurse understands his/her accountability for documenting on the clinical record the
care he/she personally provides to the clients.
2. The nurse documents the care process including information or concerns communicated to
another health care provider.
3. The nurse documents all relevant information about clients in chronological order with date
and time.
4. The nurse carries out comprehensive, in-depth and frequent documentation when clients
are acutely ill, high risk or have complex health problems.
5. The nurse documents timely the care he/she provides.
6. The nurse corrects any documentation error in a timely and forthright manner.
7. The nurse remarks any late entry, if indicated, with both date and time of the late entry and
of the actual event.
8. The nurse indicates his/her accountability by adding his/her signature and title as approved
by his/her organization to each entry and correction he/she makes on the clinical record.
9. The nurse safeguards the privacy, security and confidentiality of clinical record by
appropriate storage and custody.
10. The nurse updates himself/herself with contemporary documentation knowledge.

Legal pitfalls of improper documentation
1. Faulty record keeping practices
2. Absence of information
3. Charting after the fact
4. Missing records and time gaps
5. Vague entries
6. Late entries
7. Improper corrections
8. Unauthorised entries
9. Use of unauthorised abbreviations
10. Illegible handwriting
11. Documenting personal opinion

How to avoid the legal pitfalls of Nursing documentation
1. Number, date and sign all entries
2. Use generally accepted medical abbreviations
3. Document immediately or soon thereafter when caring for your patient
4. Document exactly what you see, hear or smell
5. Avoid innuendos
6. Avoid use of correction fluid
7. Avoid writing with pencil
8. Do not chart for others
9. Avoid record tempering
10. Do not leave blank spaces for others to chart later
11. Maintain privacy

REFERENCES
1.Bjorvell, C., Wredling, R. and Thorell-Ekstrand, I. (2003). Prerequisites and Consequences of Nursing Documentation in Patient Records as Perceived by a Group of Registered Nurse.

2.Journal of Clinical Nursing. 12, 206-214.
Brooks, J. T. (1998). An Analysis of Nursing Documentation as a Reflection of Actual Nurse Work. Medsurg Nursing. 7(4), 189-198.

3.Cheevakaesmsook, A., Chapman, Y, Francis, K. and Davies, C. (2006). The Study of
Nursing Documentation Complexities. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 12, 366-374.

4.College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia. (2008). Nursing Documentation (Practice
Support – pub. 151). Online Retrieved Jul 10, 2008 from http://www.crnbc.ca

5.College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia. (2008). Documentation (Practice
Standard – pub. 334). Online Retrieved Jul 10, 2008 from http://www.crnbc.ca/Nursing
Practice/Requirements.aspx
Ioanna, P., Stiliani, K. and Vasiliki, B. (2008).

6.Nursing Documentation and Recording
Systems of Nursing Care. ICUS Nurs WEB Journal, Issue 30-31. Online. Retrieved Jul 10,
2008 from http://www.nursing.gr

7.Mahler, C., Ammenwerth, E., Wagner, A., Tautz, A., Happek, T., Hoppe, B. And Eichstadte, R. (2007). Effects of a Computer-based Nursing Documentation System on the Quality of Nursing Documentation. J Med Sys. 31, 274-282.

8.Pyrek., K. M. (2008). Documentation is Crucial to the Medico-Legal Process. Online.
Retrieved Jul 10, 2008 from http://www.forensicnursemag.com/articles/351feat2.html

Senator Kwankwaso The Nigerian Nursing Ambassador

Hardly will anyone write the history of the development and advancement of Nursing Profession in Nigeria especially the northern part without acknowledging the enormous contributions and supports of Sen Rabi’u Musa Kwankwaso. Sen Kwankwaso is a former two-time Executive Governor Of Kano State and a former Senator of the 8th National Assembly. He also served as Defence Minister under President Olusegun Obasanjo tenure. During his administration as governor of Kano State, Kwankwaso sponsored several nurses with RN Diploma Certificates to pursue their degrees in one of the Universities in Egypt. He further established two additional Colleges of Nursing and Midwifery in the State. One situated at his LGA of Madobi and the other one at Gwarzo LGA. While serving as Senator in the 8th NASS Kwankwaso singlehandedly sponsored a bill with the number SB.451. The title of the Bill is “AN ACT TO AMEND NURSING AND MIDWIFERY (REGISTERATION ETC) ACT CAP N143 LAWS OF THE FEDERATION OF NIGERIA 2004, TO RESTRUCTURE THE COMPOSITION OF THE COUNCIL, QUALIFICATION AND TENURE OF THE OFFICE OF THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL, REVIEW PENALTY PROVISIONS, COMPOSITION OF THE TRIBUNAL, BACHELOR OF NURSING SCIENCE AND COMMUNITY MIDWIVES IN THE REGISTRABLE QUALIFICATIONS OF THE COUNCIL, GIVE THE COUNCIL TIMELINE WITHIN WHICH TO COMPLETE INDEXING OF THE STUDENTS, REGISTER PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS, AND THEM LICENSE AND COMMUNICATE THE DECISION OF THE COUNCIL TO INSTITUTIONS THAT APPLY FOR APPROVAL AND OTHER RELATED MATTERS”. The Bill received the First and Second Reading on the floor of the Senate on 22/03/2017 and 20/12/2017 respectively. Unfortunately the Bill stopped at the Committee Level. The Bill will have ensured alot of reforms in Nursing in Nigeria. We hope the Bill be passed one day. But it will take the presence of personalities like Sen Kwankwaso at the National Assembly (NASS) for the Bill to be amended and passed into law. To the amazement of many individuals even out of office Sen. Kwankwaso didn’t back off in his interest and desire to see the progress of Nursing Profession. The distinguished former Senator started the construction and establishment of the only private College of Nursing in Kano State to be commissioned soon. So far the college has been said to be equipped with state-of-the-art instruments and facilitaties. He situated the college at his home town of Kwankwaso in Madobi LGA. The college is named Nafisatu College of Nursing and Midwifery (NAFCONM), Kwankwaso. NAFCONM will become the second private college of nursing in Northern Nigeria and the only one in Kano State. What impresses so much about Sen Kwankwaso is the choice of the 21st of October the day he will celebrating his birthday to commission the College. Congratulations and Happ birthday in advance distinguished Senator. Going through the various contributions to Nursing by this politician, one will begin to wonder why is this his special interest and passion on the development of Nursing? For me, the reasons are not far-fetched. It is due to his passion for an improved healthcare delivery system in Nigeria. Sen Kwankwaso deserves commendation and encouragement from all stakeholders in the Healthcare industry for his zeal and passion to see improvement in healthcare delivery. Nursing Associations and bodies in the country must rewards the selfless efforts of Sen Kwankwaso and motivate many others. Nursing Profession is the bedrock of the healthcare industry. For an effective healthcare delivery system in any nation the welfare and working conditions of Nurses must be taken care of and improved. It is in this regards that the World Health Organization (WHO) declared 2020 as Year of the Nurses. WHO has encouraged all countries of the world to celebrate and appreciate the efforts of Nurses in promoting, preventing and curing patients of all ages and backgrounds across the globe. In conclusion, on my personal capacity and in recognition of various contributions of Sen. Kwankwaso to Nursing Profession in Nigeria I hereby him award this title: NIGERIAN NURSING AMBASSADOR.

Bilyaminu Bala Yahya
FMC YOLA
08109316250
bilyaminubala4@gmail.com

UGONSA Moans Nurse Sunday Okorie

The unfortunate news reaching our desk is that we lost our very ardent member, Nur.Sunday Okorie, to a ghastly motor accident. Nur.Sunday until his death was a critical stakeholder of the association in Enugu State.

His cerebral contributions to scientific sessions in Enugu State and at National Professional Conference will be greatly missed. Until death he was the head of Nursing Services (HNS), Federal Neuropsychiatry Hospital Enugu (FNHE). He was a deputy director of Nursing (DDNS).

His death makes it our two consecutive loss of HNS of the same within same year in a space of six months interval. In the earlier quarter of the year we lost our astute and visionary Nur.Maria Amadi, PhD, who until her murder by armed robbers was also the HNS of the hospital. Now the DDNS that replaced her has also died prematurely. What did we do to deserve this? How do we live with these colossal losses? What more can we do other than looking up to God? The pain is unbearable!!!

We hereby call for one hour silence on all our social media platforms. Within the next one hour nobody should make any post or comment on our platforms. We shall use this period to pray for the soul of departed Nur.Sunday & Nur.Maria and to ask God to divinely intervene to arrest whatever evil that has besieged FNHE and Nursing profession in general. Your one hour starts anytime you see this message and you must end your prayer by posting “May their Soul Rest in Peace. Amen/Amin”!!!
UGONSA is deeply mourning!!!!

Signed:

Nur.G.I.Nshi,
UGONSA National Secretary.

UAE Phases Out Diploma In Nursing, Indian Nurses Jobs At Risk

-Nurses without university degrees were demoted

Dubai: Jobs of hundreds of Indian nurses with diploma certificates are at stake due to a new educational requirement in the UAE, Gulf News has learnt.

More than 200 nurses have lost their jobs from some hospitals in northern emirates while several others have been demoted after the UAE made a bachelor’s degree in nursing as the minimum educational qualification for registered nurses, affected nurses said.

Nurses with diploma certificates, who continue to be retained, are required to do a Post Basic BSc Nursing Programme from universities in the UAE accredited by the Ministry of Education by 2020, they said.

However, several nurses, who have enrolled for the programmes in different universities, are now facing another crisis—their requests for equivalency certificate for their diploma certificates are getting rejected.

Equivalency issue

The UAE’s Ministry of Education (MoE) here is issuing equivalency certificate for diploma certificates obtained from the state of Kerala, the nursing council of which is the only Indian nursing body recognised by the ministry, the affected nurses explained. Kerala sends the highest number of nurses to the country.

    Most of us have more than 10 years’ experience in the UAE and sponsor our families. Many have been holding senior positions. We have high hopes that both Indian and the UAE authorities will take urgent measures to solve this crisis.
    – Nurses speak to Gulf News

Nurses, who have obtained their diploma certificates from other Indian states, are now in a limbo even though they have been able to prove the genuineness of their qualifications by getting the necessary attestations done through the Indian Consulate in Dubai, they said.

“Majority of us are hailing from Kerala itself. But we studied outside Kerala for our nursing diploma courses. A few nurses from other Indian states are also facing the same issue,” said one of the affected nurses.

The nurses said the MoE is not recognising certificates issued from boards of examinations from other states despite all the states’ nursing councils following the same curriculum governed by the Indian Nursing Council.

They said this has made lives miserable for those who joined the Post Basic BSc Nursing course with the hope of continuing to work in the UAE.

Since the MoE is not issuing an equivalency certificate for them, some universities are not allowing them to continue their education, they said.

“Many of us have already lost our jobs and now we are unable to continue our studies and apply for another job, leaving us in a “do or die’’ situation,” said one nurse.

Urgent intervention

The nurses said they are demanding the urgent intervention of the authorities to include the Indian Nursing Council in the approved list of the Ministry of Education, UAE, and recognise the certificates issued by boards of examinations from other states also.

“Most of us have more than 10 years’ experience in the UAE and sponsor our families. Many have been holding senior positions. We have high hopes that both Indian and the UAE authorities will take urgent measures to solve this crisis,” said one nurse.

Nurses said they are paying Dh55,000 to Dh75,000 for the courses at different universities. They said some nurses are not able to continue the classes without submitting the equivalency certificates.

The nurses said they would approach India’s Minister of State for External Affairs V. Muraleedharan, who is scheduled to visit the UAE this week, seeking his urgent intervention to solve the issue.

Ramesh Mannath, president of the Indian People’s Forum in Dubai, said the nurses would be facilitated to meet the minister.

When contacted, Consul General of India in Dubai, Vipul, said: “We have already taken it up with the nursing councils in India and the local authorities here and we hope that a solution will be found soon.”
What is the crisis all about?

The UAE has made bachelor’s degree in nursing as the minimum educational qualification for registered nurses. Many who have done diploma in nursing have lost their jobs and some have been demoted.

Nurses with diploma certificates, who have been retained, are required to do a Post Basic BSc Nursing Programme from universities in the UAE accredited by the Ministry of Education by 2020.

However, the Ministry of Education is only issuing equivalency certificate for diploma certificates issued by the nursing council in the state of Kerala, which sends the highest number of nurses to the country.

Nurses, who have done diploma courses from other Indian states are urging the UAE ministry to recognise the Indian Nursing Council which governs all the state nursing councils so that their diploma certificates can also be recognised with equivalency certificates from here.

Source: Guff News

New Zealand Nurse Registration Process Made Easier, Now Accept CGFNS Report

The New Zealand Nurse registration process for foreign trained Nurses has changed as the process has now been made easier and faster and accepting CGFNS verification report. Below is the message posted by the regulatory body on her page.

From 15 October 2019, the registration process for Internationally Qualified Nurses (IQN) now requires two steps:

    Step 1: IQN must first apply to CGFNS International, Inc (CGFNS), which will verify and authenticate all documents through its Credentials Verification Service;

    Step 2: IQN will then apply directly to the Nursing Council, which will assess them against New Zealand nursing standards and issue a decision to the IQN.

This change will offer a more efficient and timely service to IQNs. Below are the frequently asked questions.

What documents do I need to apply to CGFNS?

Please refer to the CGFNS Applicant Portal for more information – click here https://ncnz.cgfns.org/#documents

Do my documents need to be translated by CGFNS?

CGFNS requires your documents to be translated into English.

I do not have two years’ post registration experience. Can I still apply?

If you have not worked as a nurse for at least two of the last five years, you will still be able to apply to the CGFNS Credentials Verification Service, but the decision made by the Nursing Council may be affected, including your application being declined. 
If you have no nursing experience, you are not eligible to apply to the Nursing Council.

Why do I need to complete the CGFNS credentials verification process?

CGFNS International Inc specialises in verifying and authenticating documents.

Do I need to electronically upload my documents?

Yes, you will be required to electronically upload documents. This is all part of the credential verification process you must undertake with CGFNS.

How long will this process take?

Credentials verification will take approximately 30 days once all required documentation has been received by CGFNS. The Nursing Council assessment and registration process is then expected to take up to 30 days once you have responded to their invitation to apply.

Do I need to complete the CGFNS Qualifying Exam?

No.

How do I check the status of my CGFNS verification request?

Log in to your CGFNS Applicant Portal

Can I apply for an ELA waiver?

If you completed your nursing education and are registered as a nurse in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada or the United States of America, you can request a waiver of the English language standard. If you have registered and practised in one of the above countries and you had to complete an English language test to gain registration, you may also apply for a waiver of the English language standard.

As part of your request to CGFNS to have your credentials verified you will be able to request a waiver, and the Council will then make a decision.

How do I apply for registration?

Once your credentials have been verified and authenticated by CGFNS you will be invited to apply to the Nursing Council.

Do I need to submit my documents to Nursing Council?

CGFNS will send all the documents you have provided directly to the Nursing Council.

Do I need to complete a criminal record check?

Yes. The Nursing Council will tell you how and when to do this.

Can I withdraw my application?

You can withdraw your application at any stage. However, all fees you have paid are non-refundable.


Language Proficiency Requirement

    You will have to demonstrate your ability to read, write, listen and speak in the English language through the submission of language proficiency test results from an approved testing vendor, barring certain exemption requests (see below).
    If you are not exempt, you must schedule yourself for approved English language proficiency tests with approved testing vendors. The approved testing vendors are:
        Occupational English Test (OET)
        International English Language Testing System (IELTS)-Academic Module Only
    Non-exempt IQNs must successfully complete an approved test no more than two years and 11 months prior to the submission of the Credentials Verification Service report to NCNZ. Because of the time it may take to complete your CVS-NCNZ, we recommend you avoid sending test results that are over one year old.
    The required minimum scores for the approved tests are:
        Occupational English Test (OET)
            For results prior to August 2018: you must achieve a minimum score of a ‘B’ for each band: reading, writing, listening and speaking. A ‘C+’ is not considered a pass.
            For results after September 2018: you must achieve a minimum score of 350 for each band: reading, writing, listening and speaking. A ‘C+’ (300 – 340) is not considered a pass.
        International English Language Testing System (IELTS)-Academic Module
            You must achieve a minimum score of 7 for each band: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Passing scores on the individual sections of the tests can be combined if taken within 12 months of each other. Passing sections from different testing vendors cannot combine. For more information, view the complete standards on the NCNZ website.

Exemption Rules

You may request a waiver of language testing if:

    Your nursing education was conducted in and you are registered to practice in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada or the United States of America; or
    You registered and practiced in the UK, Ireland, Canada and the USA, AND you were required to pass an English language test to gain registration

IQNs who meet waiver criteria will be given the ability to request a waiver of English Language Proficiency Requirements electronically. CGFNS will submit the waiver request to NCNZ with the Credentials Verification Service program report and NCNZ will decide whether to grant the waiver or not.

Exposé: Sex and Money for Jobs; The Plight of Young Doctors, Nurses in Kenya

The birth of the new 2010 constitution brought with it hope for a better Kenya. Devolution was seen to be the solution to the rampant corruption, unemployment and nepotism experienced in the national government. One sector where there was so much hope was the health sector. It was believed that counties would bring health services closer to the people and employ more medical personnel.

Fast forward, almost a decade after the promulgation of the 2010 constitution, things have gotten from bad to worse. The new constitution devolved all these ills to the counties.

254News, has been receiving cases of medical professionals being asked by members of County Public Service Boards (CPSB) to give huge sums of money and even sex in exchange for employment on contract/locum basis. These allegations have spanned many counties across the country.

Our investigations led us to Kisumu County, one of the counties piloting the government’s Universal Health Coverage (UHC) agenda, from where we have received most complains. The county recently advertised and interviewed for various positions in the health department including nurses, pharmaceutical technologists, clinical officers among others. We closely monitored the whole process and can authoritatively report that there are insiders at the Kisumu County Public Service Board that have access to the details of shortlisted applicants who attended the interview and they are using these details to solicit for bribes to offer employment. This all begun from the stage of advertisement. Applicants reported being asked to pay as high as Ksh 45,000 in order to be shortlisted for interviews. Those who claimed to have no money say they were never called for interviews.
The interviews were done some time back and the list of the successful candidates and their letters made ready. But this presented another opportunity for these sex predators and corrupt fellows to demand for more. One man has notoriously been calling each shortlisted candidate, threatening that if he doesn’t receive money then the candidate will not get the employment. This person sends messages using the phone number +254731130906. The number is registered to one Beryl Akinyi.

One of the young men shortlisted for the position of pharmaceutical technologist (name withheld) fell for the trick. He was asked to pay 40,000/- and after negotiations and pleadings, he sent Ksh 10,000 yesterday morning. Below is the Mpesa message;

_NJF89SR3DS Confirmed. Ksh10,000.00 sent to GEORGE OWIRA OGOLA 0720435331 on 15/10/19 at 10:31 AM. New M-PESA balance is…_

Those, like the above pharm tech, who have sent money shortly afterwards received a message asking them to collect their letters from the CPSB office. Such was the case also before the interviews where one had to pay to be invited for interviews. Below was the message sent for invitation for the interviews;

_You are invited for interview for Pharmaceutical Tech. on 27-08-2019 @ X:YZ am at public service board offices,Milimani, Okore Road. Carry ID, certs, licence, testimonials & clearances. Check more details at www.kisumu.go.ke. Beryl_

Below is the message sent to those who paid to be employed on locum basis;

_Good morning. I refer to the interview you did with the Board in which you were successful. Please come for your appointment letter at the Public Service Board Milimani, Okore Road before 18/10/19. Congratulations! Beryl, KCPSB._

The message is sent from the same number that invited the candidates for the interviews (0731130906)

A nurse applicant was called and asked for ksh30,000 but insisted she had no money. She was asked to meet someone at Joventure Hotel one evening so that they can “sort out” her issue. It turned out she was expected to give herself to this man, a thing she declined and ran off.

Yet another was asked to pay 20k, after “discount” but couldn’t raise the amount.

These young people who refused or couldn’t raise the bribes haven’t received any feedback or letter. Instead, the conman threatened to give the vacancies to other people because “there are many people on the waiting list and are desperate for the job”.
Yet another lady nurse was called and asked to send 45k for a permanent and pensionable job. The vacancies that had been advertised were for locum jobs.

It is clear that the conman is within the Board and has access to the files and documents. The tricky part of it all is that the conman is being protected by some police officers at Central Police Station and some powerful people at the county headquarters who are benefiting from the monies he is collecting. It is not the first time he is doing this as some health workers within the county who spoke to 254News on condition of anonymity confirmed to us that they too had gone through the same ordeal. For example, we were informed that the same happened some time last year and the George Owira Ogola was arrested but later released under mysterious circumstances.

It has become apparent that Beryl works with George Ogola in demanding and receiving the monies. When confronted about this on phone, she did not respond but instead ended the call.

The monies are said to run into huge amounts when the county advertises for positions of medical officers, pharmacists and dentists. So huge are the amounts that some claim to have used over Ksh 250,000 for “lobbying” during the process in order to land a job with the county.

This is not just an isolated case of Kisumu county. We met one young doctor who did her internship in Nairobi county. She confided in us that she has had to go through the same ordeal.
“What I do is look for fellow women. That way I can use money without being asked for sex on top. Let’s just say it’s a bit easier that way”, she said.

The young doctors graduating from medical school have reported being advised by their senior colleagues in employment that they need to save half of the money they earn during their 1 year internship to be used to lobby for employment. It seems this has been normalized and sanitized as the new way of doing things.

254News has also received cases indicating that some of these young doctors have to part with 30,000/- from their salaries every month. These monies are sent to some county government officers in order to keep these doctors employed. They live under the threat that if they fail to remit the money, they will be sacked. These young doctors say that they do this because it is better than staying unemployed.

Meanwhile, the doctors’ union among other unions have remained tight lipped over this turn of events. The union claims it cannot respond to individual issues and that those seeking employment should lobby with their county governments. What they fail to tell the young doctors and interns is that this lobby means bribing members of the CPSB with money and sex, an act they are sanctioning. Any attempts to have the union address these issues have been met with coldness and arrogance.

The young doctors now blame the union for using them then throwing them under the bus during the CBA negotiations. They claim the union used the issue of poor doctor:patient ratio during the 2016/17 strike but never addressed it while negotiating for the CBA.

“The union leaders negotiated for their pay and abandoned all other issues. Tell me, how has the CBA improved health services 2 years down the line after its signing? How did the CBA address the issue of low doctor:populations ratio? It was just more money they were looking for”, posed one unemployed doctor.

Source: http://www.254news.co.ke/2019/10/16/expose-sex-and-money-for-jobs-the-plight-of-young-doctors-nurses-in-counties/?fbclid=IwAR1gK8OZjx-g6DGvMCaWKCAGaJJoKVeo-yYwIYxU3t3W_CUp5heWIdpGvW0

Improve Nurses Welfare For Universal Coverage

Universal health coverage will remain a pipe dream if Nurses’ welfare is not improved, a World Bank official has said.

Lead health specialist in Africa Dr Khama Rogo said Nurses sit at the centre of the health sector and are pivotal in achieving UHC.

But the profession is slowly dying in Africa as Nurses struggle to juggle their low-paying jobs and their families, he said.

“Leaders need to understand that someone who wakes up at night to go look after people who are bleeding, others who can’t breathe, can’t be expected to give a report in the morning, smile and take their kids to school,” Rogo said.

He was addressing the National Nurses Association of Kenya annual Scientific Conference in Murang’a town on Wednesday.
“It is no wonder that it has become so easy for nurses and doctors to go on strike and compete with politicians,” Rogo said.

Out of the 90,000 nurses in Kenya, the government can only account for 30,000, he said.

This is despite the country having the second-highest number of nurses in East, Central and Southern Africa after South Africa, which has 250,000.

Rogo said Nurses outnumber Doctors in a ratio of 20:1 and cannot, therefore, be dismissed in the implementation of UHC.

“A Nurse is the only health-skilled professional who can work from the primary care level to the tertiary care level without help”,

– World Bank lead health specialist in Africa Dr Khama Rogo

He urged the government to meet Nurses and discuss how primary healthcare should be run.

For UHC to work, the official said, the government will also have to train Nurses in specialised areas such as oncology, cardiovascular, renal and other critical areas.

Rogo said many Nurses have abandoned their jobs to further their studies in search of better pay and to climb the job ladder.

“This has exposed patients to the care of community and village health workers who should be working under a Nurse. We live in a country where the Nurses are jobless but we have money to pay village health workers who should not work alone,” he said.

The government should instead look for ways to ensure Nurses at the primary care level, which should be the focus of UHC, are well remunerated, Rogo said.

He urged Nurses to form a strong united group that will task the leadership to improve their work environment.

Rogo said it is time for Nurses to demonstrate their leadership, impact and skills, especially after the government picked health as one of its key development pillars.

“A Nurse is the only health-skilled professional who can work from the primary care level to the tertiary care level without help,” he noted.

Rogo said the Nurses’ organisation should organise itself such that any institution seeking Nurses comes to them for help.

NNAK president Alfred Obuya faulted county governments for employing Nurses on contract.

He said it is pitiful that some Nurses are being paid Sh20,000 without a gratuity and cannot access the same services they provide when they need them.

Obuya said the Health Human Resource department should be reverted to the national government.

Stakeholders should also find amicable ways to make the Health Service Commission a reality, the Nurses’ president said.

But parliamentary Health committee chairperson Sabina Chege said such a move would require a referendum.

She said the Health Act provides for an agency that brings together all health professionals that can be used to champion their interests.

I Am Not A Doctor, I Am A Nurse By Otieno Jasiaya


– when you provide life saving actions and the patients relatives say “thank you DOCTOR”, tell them “I AM A NURSE”

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, standing and outdoor

– when you provide aid to an accident victim on the roadside and the people around appreciate your effort and say “God bless you Doctor”, politely tell them “I am not a doctor;I AM A NURSE”

– When a police officer at the checkpoint pull you over in your expensive ride and refer to you as a doctor because of the big JEEP and stethoscope hanging on the center mirror, tell him “OFFICER, I AM A NURSE”let him know that we do drive expensive rides.

– When you attempt and successfully resuscitate a cardiac arrest patient in the market square and every one applauds you and discuss how doctors are life savers, do not walk away without clearing the notion that we nurses are life savers, tell them please, I am a NURSE

– When as an occupational health nurse, you go for hospital or/and accommodation inspection; don’t leave the vicinity without letting them know that you are representing your organization and that you are doing such in your capacity as a NURSE

– When you are introduced at a public function as “Doctor …” probably because you have a PhD, and the audience give you a standing ovation at the end of your presentation, please take time to let them know that you are a NURSE.

-When you ensure that there is no Mother To Child HIV Transmissions despite the mother being HIV positive, The will always refer you as the doctor, be proud and tell them you’re A Nurse.

Someone needs to start setting the record straight.
All am saying is this, whether you are RN, RM, BNSc or PhD, It high time we began to make our presence felt in every little way possible, one step at a time. This is one way of redeeming our image, one way we can accord ourselves the respect we derserve .

Go out today and be a proud nurse. Let the public know who we really are and that all that we do which is a sharp contrast to what they see in the movies and read in the media.

I am NOT a Doctor; I am proudly a Nurse!
#NurseOtieno #Hero #NursesAreHeroes



NCLEX Examination Centre Opens in Johannesburg South Africa

Nurses in Africa who plan to sit for the US Nurse Licensure Exam will no longer have to spend their entire life savings on flight tickets to India and Philippines as Pearson Vue has approved the take off of NCLEX Exam in South Africa beginning from January 2020.

This was disclosed on Friday by Facebook user Nomso Opara in a post which had since gone viral on various social media platform.

Below is a copy of her post as sighted by Nursesarena:

Nurses in Africa who plan to sit for the US Nurse Licensure Exam will no longer have to spend their entire life savings on flight tickets to India and Philippines as Pearson Vue has approved the take off of NCLEX Exam in South Africa beginning from January 2020.

This was disclosed on Friday by Facebook user Nomso Opara in a post which had since gone viral on various social media platform.

Below is a copy of her post:

So, this past January, I was shocked to learn that African Nurses have to travel to Asia ( Phillipines or India) to take USA NCLEX (Board exam). I could not believe that these nurses were subjected to such risk just to take an exam for greener pastures. I did some research and found out that  Pearson Vue is responsible for setting up NCLEX testing centers. I tried contacting them, all to no avail.  Well, three weeks ago, while attending a conference in Phoenix Arizona, I ran into a Person Vue senior staff, we conversed for a few minutes and I was able to present my case for African nurses.  After our little chat, we exchanged business cards. Surprisingly, she reached out to me a few days later.  She promised  to investigate the need for a Center in Africa.  Later that week, she emailed me again and requested for some data to validate my request.  Luckily, I was able to provide her with some valid information.  We exchanged a few emails and had few phone conversations.  To my greatest surprise, I received an email this morning from this wonderful woman, stating that she presented my case to Pearson Vue and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) executives and that my request to have a Center in Africa has been granted🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽 and will be in effect from January 2020. I couldn’t hold back tears. Who could have believed that something of this magnitude would be realized through little me. Thank you  so  much to you, my wonderful lady from Pearson Vue, Pearson Vue and NCSBN. Congratulations to African Nurses👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽, You guys can take your USA Board in African from January 2020! To say that I’m humbled is an understatement.  It can only be God!! I always fight for causes I believe in and hope you do too. And NO, there is nothing in this for me😀, it is all to mitigate risk for African nurses!!

Nneoma Chinomso Oparah, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

So, this past January, I was shocked to learn that African Nurses have to travel to Asia ( Phillipines or India) to take USA NCLEX (Board exam). I could not believe that these nurses were subjected to such risk just to take an exam for greener pastures. I did some research and found out that  Pearson Vue is responsible for setting up NCLEX testing centers. I tried contacting them, all to no avail.  Well, three weeks ago, while attending a conference in Phoenix Arizona, I ran into a Person Vue senior staff, we conversed for a few minutes and I was able to present my case for African nurses.  After our little chat, we exchanged business cards. Surprisingly, she reached out to me a few days later.  She promised  to investigate the need for a Center in Africa.  Later that week, she emailed me again and requested for some data to validate my request.  Luckily, I was able to provide her with some valid information.  We exchanged a few emails and had few phone conversations.  To my greatest surprise, I received an email this morning from this wonderful woman, stating that she presented my case to Pearson Vue and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) executives and that my request to have a Center in Africa has been granted🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽 and will be in effect from January 2020. I couldn’t hold back tears. Who could have believed that something of this magnitude would be realized through little me. Thank you  so  much to you, my wonderful lady from Pearson Vue, Pearson Vue and NCSBN. Congratulations to African Nurses👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽, You guys can take your USA Board in African from January 2020! To say that I’m humbled is an understatement.  It can only be God!! I always fight for causes I believe in and hope you do too. And NO, there is nothing in this for me😀, it is all to mitigate risk for African nurses!!

Nneoma Chinomso Oparah, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC