How to make payment into Nursing and midwifery new Treasury Single Account

To make payment for renewal of license, change of name, indexing etc to the Nursing and Midwifery council of Nigeria, you can either walk into some of the participating banks and make the payment into the single Treasury Account (TSA) through REMITA or initiate the transaction from the comfort of your home.

HOW TO GENERATE REMITA RETRIEVAL REFERENCE CODE

STEP 1: Click  here

STEP 2:In Name of MDA type Nursing and Midwifery council of Nigeria; in Name Of Service/Purpose pick your purpose (e.g Renewal of license fee); Payer’s full name enter your name as it appears on your license ( Note: If you are paying for change of name please use your NEW NAME); enter the amount (if it is not already generated), your email and phone number and the captcha and click on PROCEED TO MAKE PAYMENT

STEP 3: You will be taken to your invoice page showing your Remita Retrieval Reference (RRR),the beneficiary name (NMCN), the total amount payable and the payment options available.  You have four payment options which are:
-Internet banking through: Access bank,  GTB,Sterling bank,Wema bank, Diamond,Keystone, FCMB,Zenith and Skye bank among others
-Remita (for registered users)
-Cards/Wallets: Verve, Mastercard, Visa card and Pocketmoni
-Cash payments in bank:The participating banks are; Mainstreet ,Sterling,Enterprise,Access,KBL,First Bank,Wema,Unity Bank,Heritage,Standard Chartered,Union bank,Citibank,Ecobank,Zenith bank,FCMB,Stanbic,UBA,GTB,Diamond,Fidelity and Skye bank

If you choose the bank payment option, simplycopy your Remita Retrieval Reference (RRR) ( This is the code banks required from you) and move to any of the participating banks to proceed with the payment. You are required to collect a Teller and a computer printout of your payment.

Earlier version of this post appeared thus but was deleted during a routine maintenance exercise


To make the payment, simply walk into any bank preferably First Bank and tell the teller that you want to make payment into the NURSING AND MIDWIFERY COUNCIL OF NIGERIA ACCOUNT VIA REMITA. You will be asked to fill a teller and the transaction will be completed within few minutes. You will be given a COMPUTER PRINTOUT and a TELLER.

You can however start the process at home. To do this simply go to http://www.remita.net/ and click on PAY A FEDERAL AGENCY. On the page type NURSING AND MIDWIFERY COUNCIL in the “Name of MDA” and wait for it to load.

In “Name Of Service/Purpose” box choose your desired service payment e.g license renewal, accreditation payment, Indexing, change of name etc.

Enter the amount, your name as it appears on your license and your email and phone numbers (optional). Then type the captcha in the box and click on PROCEED TO PAYMENT

On the payment page, you have the option of either paying online through your ATM card/Internet banking and through the bank.

If you choose the banking route, you need to copy the transaction reference number and write it on your teller.

The Quest For Power By Goodwin Imeka RN

I constantly inquire of you youth and their idea of participating in active politics and the response most often is laughable, some possess very terrible ideologies brought about by the media and negative depiction by nollywood. Some say, when I ask why they detest politics, politics is a dirty game, politics is- who knows you?, politics is evil etc. They even go as far as admonishing that I steered clear of it, especially when I expose my intention of participating in politics.
POLITICS AND OUR WORLD
What people don’t understand is that every aspect of our lives is governed by politics, if I must eat good food, it is politics, if I have to enjoy good health, politics, if I should gave sound education, politics. There is nothing we do that keeps politics apart.

Politics is all about making acquiring power for the better policy making, it is an active participation in community and community issues.

Unlike most advanced countries where youth are guided through to becoming leaders, ours is a case where youth are scared to their marrows with politicians using them for devious means, the media portraying it as evil and dirty.

When we hunger for change, it is up to us to great that change, if we feel our politicians have failed us, it is up to us to get involved and change processes, cha he laws and make life better for our country. It is easy to wail but that in totality does not take us an inch away from our current position.

POLITICS AND NURSING – THE WAY TO GROW
I decided to save this for now, best wine last… We were discussing the plight faced by health workers especially nurses and how policies were not aptly made or when made were not executed to the latter, after various stories, I mentioned that all these were reasons why every nurse ought to be in politics, and our lecturer asked ‘if we all get into politics, who will do the job?’
Being in politics does not stop a nurse from doing his or her job, actually, when we can change stiff laws and policies, it makes our job even more enjoyable.

Recently, the Kenyan nurses association dragged the government to court because the government seems to be playing favouritism on the part of doctors, this is because doctors occupy top positions, every fund for health will go through them before it gets to others. The case is not different from what we are experiencing here in Nigeria, who is the minister of health? Who is the minister of labour? Now how can nurses get the desire for consultancy status and residency and prescribing right when no one is there to fight for us?

Power isn’t evil, we do not need to fear it, no one will remember you because you were verily afraid, no one will appreciate you because you are perfect at running away. Think of how far nursing has come, why are we now an independent profession, who made that possible? Fearless nursing theorist, practitioners, advocates etc who desired the betterment of nursing profession accomplished all those for us, what are YOU doing to change things, do YOU like the status quo? Or you just want to complain?

SAY NO TO COMPLAINING AND GET TO GET WORK.

— Human right is not what is placed on the table, it is what you go out and fight for —

Thanks

By Godwin Imeka RN

Misconceptions About Oncology Nursing By Kim Johnson

Many people think that this field is filled with sadness. And while it does have its difficult days, oncology nursing is also extremely rewarding. I’ve heard that most nurses don’t know their specialty when they apply for nursing school. That makes me an outlier, because I knew before I ever applied to school. I am studying with the goal of being an oncology nurse.

When people ask my chosen field and I tell them, the question of “why?” quickly follows. Because after all, this is “such a hard field,” and “there is so much despair and sadness with cancer.” To those who have said that before, or even to those who can relate to the statements above, I’d like to take a brief moment of your time to provide a differing perspective.

Cancer is hard. It is draining and takes a toll on life. It is a terrible disease that does much damage, and not every story ends well. But it is also so much more than that. I understand that from the outside looking in, the field of oncology may look full of despair. But having worked in various aspects of this field, I think that there is far more hope than despair. There is so much hope for a cure that seems to be just beyond the horizon.

Yes, death occurs in the field of oncological medicine. It also occurs, at some point, in every aspect of life. In western culture, we tend to shun death. When in truth, it is an important aspect of every life.

As a nurse, we get to help guide somebody and be privy to an incredibly intimate moment in somebody’s life. We get to see the success when that patient gets good news. We also are blessed with the chance to hold a patient’s hand through what may be the end of their f life.

Through time, I have come to feel that one of the most important things within oncology is to be positive. I am not suggesting being ignorant to the realities of cancer. No, I am simply saying that as a caregiver, how we present ourselves to patients and families matter. Through my sister’s journey, we were lucky to be graced with nurses and a care team filled with positivity.

In watching them, I came to understand the field of nursing – specifically oncology nursing, and found my calling in life. While this field can be hard, I find that it is often far more rewarding.

So, next time you see somebody who works in oncology, or even somebody like myself who will one day work in the field, I would like to challenge you. I challenge you to stop and think about some of words that I have written above, and to be like the oncology nurses we were lucky enough to have and practice the power of positivity.

By Kim Johnson | Curetoday
About The Author:
Kim is a nursing student who is hoping to find her place amongst the phenomenal oncology nurses and doctors who cared for her sister. She loves reading, volunteering and enjoying the outdoors of Colorado

Misconceptions About Oncology Nursing By Kim Johnson

Many people think that this field is filled with sadness. And while it does have its difficult days, oncology nursing is also extremely rewarding. I’ve heard that most nurses don’t know their specialty when they apply for nursing school. That makes me an outlier, because I knew before I ever applied to school. I am studying with the goal of being an oncology nurse.

When people ask my chosen field and I tell them, the question of “why?” quickly follows. Because after all, this is “such a hard field,” and “there is so much despair and sadness with cancer.” To those who have said that before, or even to those who can relate to the statements above, I’d like to take a brief moment of your time to provide a differing perspective.

Cancer is hard. It is draining and takes a toll on life. It is a terrible disease that does much damage, and not every story ends well. But it is also so much more than that. I understand that from the outside looking in, the field of oncology may look full of despair. But having worked in various aspects of this field, I think that there is far more hope than despair. There is so much hope for a cure that seems to be just beyond the horizon.
Yes, death occurs in the field of oncological medicine. It also occurs, at some point, in every aspect of life. In western culture, we tend to shun death. When in truth, it is an important aspect of every life.

As a nurse, we get to help guide somebody and be privy to an incredibly intimate moment in somebody’s life. We get to see the success when that patient gets good news. We also are blessed with the chance to hold a patient’s hand through what may be the end of their f life.

Through time, I have come to feel that one of the most important things within oncology is to be positive. I am not suggesting being ignorant to the realities of cancer. No, I am simply saying that as a caregiver, how we present ourselves to patients and families matter. Through my sister’s journey, we were lucky to be graced with nurses and a care team filled with positivity.

In watching them, I came to understand the field of nursing – specifically oncology nursing, and found my calling in life. While this field can be hard, I find that it is often far more rewarding.

So, next time you see somebody who works in oncology, or even somebody like myself who will one day work in the field, I would like to challenge you. I challenge you to stop and think about some of words that I have written above, and to be like the oncology nurses we were lucky enough to have and practice the power of positivity.

By Kim Johnson | Curetoday
About The Author:
Kim is a nursing student who is hoping to find her place amongst the phenomenal oncology nurses and doctors who cared for her sister. She loves reading, volunteering and enjoying the outdoors of Colorado

Nursing And Midwifery Council Of Nigeria Opens Registration Portal For May 2018

The Nursing And Midwifery Council Of Nigeria yesterday the 20th of March 2018 opened its portal for registration of students for its May 2018 professional exams. The portal according to its released memo would remain open from the 20th of March to the 6th of April 2018. This was contained in a letter addressed to all Principals, Schools of Nursing, Principals Schools of Post Basic Nursing (Specialties) in all States & Abuja, HOD’s Departments of Nursing and all Nigerian Universities offering degree in Nursing and tittled: RE: MAY 2018 PROFESSIONAL EXAMINATION FOR GENERAL AND POSTBASIC NURSES- OPENING OF THE EXAMINATION PORTAL

The letter was signed by the HOD Exams Anslem-Nnadi Mercy (Mrs) for the Secretary-General/Registrar and reads:

I am directed to inform you that the Council’s Examination portal is opened from Tuesday. March 20th – Friday April 6th, 2018 for all your eligible candidates for May 2018 Professional Examination for General and Post basic Nurses to complete the online application for the examination.

Please note that there will be no extension after this date and all payment of the examination fee MUST be done within this same period.

However on the payment process, the Examination fees of N38,500 for Basic Nursing programmes in Schools of Nursing/Department of Nursing and N41,250 for Post Basic Nursing programmes as applicable to your school is to be paid by each of your candidate to Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria through remita platform in any of the commercial banks.

The total sum for the school should be paid in bulk in the name of the school through remita. After successful online application and payment, a covering letter stating the names of the students who had applied for online Examination application with the original tellers of payment (remita payment slip) should be sent to the Registrar’s office in Abuja immediately after payment has been made.

For fresh candidates, the consultancy fees of N2,995 for Basic Nursing programmes in Schools/Department of Nursing and N3,187.50 for Post Basic Nursing programmes as applicable will appear on the portal and on the netpostpay slip. This should be paid individually to netpost pay through NIBBS e-bills payment platform in any commercial banks or acceptable payment channels such as debit card payment or internet banking payment platform.

Please note that amount that will appear as consultancy fees for resit candidates depends on the number of papers each resit candidate is resitting.

You are expected to pass this information to all your students and guide them properly to ensure that they initiate the right application on the portal.

Your cooperation is essential to achieve this please.

Thank you for your usual support in promoting and maintaining excellence in Nursing Education and Practice

Nigeria Restarts Midwives Services Scheme (MSS) Mobilizes 1,586 Midwives

-All who graduated from March 2016 to September 2017 to be deployed

The National Primary Health Care Development Agency has begun mobilizing 1,586 basic midwives for deployment to primary health centres nationwide in a modified Midwives Services Scheme (MSS).

All graduated from midwifery schools between March and September in 2016 and 2017, and the deployment is a one-year posting mandatory before they are licensed by the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria.

The MSS using older midwives was modified to use young graduates in efforts to cut costs, according to NPHCDA executive director Faisal Shuaib.

“This has the dual advantage of providing practical experience to the midwives prior to full certification as well as ensuring availability of skilled health workers in the very rural facilities,” he said in a statement at the start of a five-day orientation for midwifery graduates from the north central zone.

“In addition, the cost of running this new scheme would be very much less than that of the old MSS. This change of approach has remained valuable to the successful implementation of the project.”

The orientation has been zoned to save graduates the cost of travelling to a national orientation venue.

It covers training in basic guide and monitoring for routine immunisation, disease surveillance, data management, cold chain management of vaccines.

Before their licensing and deployment to designated primary health centres, the regulatory council will verify the midwives’ certification and take biometrics for documentation on the council’s database.

By: Judd-Leonard Okafor
Daily Trust News

Australian nursing and midwifery code of conduct slammed over ‘white privilege’

AUSTRALIAN nurses are pushing back against a change that requires them to “acknowledge white privilege” before treating patients.

Nurses and midwives around the country must now adhere to a new code of conduct with a section specifically dedicated to “culture” and which details white Australians’ inherent privilege “in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders”.

The new code, which came into effect in March, has been labelled “eye-watering”, “cultural madness” and “unacceptable”. A peak body representing nurses in Queensland is even calling for the chairman of the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia to be sacked over it.

“This is eye-watering stuff,” Graeme Haycroft from the Nurses Professional Association of Queensland told Sky News host Peta Credlin.

“We’re calling for the resignation of the chairman of the board (Associate Professor Lynette Cusack) because she’s put her name to it and it’s unacceptable.”

Credlin called it “almost too hard to believe”. “Before (a midwife) delivers a baby to an indigenous woman she’s supposed to put her hands up and say: ‘I need to talk to you about my white privilege’, not about my infection control, my qualifications or my training as a midwife?” she asked Mr Haycroft.

He said that was correct, but there’s no requirement to “announce” anything. The nurses must simply abide by the new code which state clearly that “cultural safety is as important to quality care as clinical safety”.

“Cultural safety … requires nurses and midwives to undertake an ongoing process of self-reflection and cultural self-awareness, and an acknowledgment of how a nurse’s/midwife’s personal culture impacts on care,” the code reads.

“In relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, cultural safety provides a decolonising model of practice based on dialogue, communication, power sharing and negotiation, and the acknowledgment of white privilege.

“These actions are a means to challenge racism at personal and institutional levels, and to establish trust in healthcare encounters.”

Mr Haycroft said the code was hastily approved with little consultation.

“It’s all of Australia. There’s 350,000 nurses and midwives Australia-wide and they’re all now subject to this new code,” he said.

“We put a little survey on our website and we asked nurses whether they agreed with the code of conduct. Just over 50 per cent of our members have said ‘this is wrong, do something about it, fight it for us’.”

The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia released a statement on March 1 asking nurses and midwives to “reflect on how the news of conduct relate to their practice”.

“These codes provide a foundation for safe practice and give guidance on crucial issues such as bullying and harassment, professional boundaries and cultural safety. Nurses and midwives need to meet the standards set in these codes, even if their employer also has a code of conduct,” Professor Cusack said.

Nurses and midwives fought the board in November last year when it was revealed a draft of the new code of conduct replaced references to “woman-centred care” with “person-centred care”.

“Midwife means with woman,” UniSA midwifery professor Mary Steen told the Adelaide Advertiser. “The woman is at the centre of a midwife’s scope of practice, which is based on the best available evidence to provide the best care and support to meet individual women’s health and wellbeing needs.”

Professor Alison Kitson, vice president and executive dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Flinders University, agreed.

“Retaining the ‘woman-centred’ term is important to remind us all that our care is focused on the women and the significant life-changing experience they are about to have,” she said.

On social media, users called the new code “stupid”.

“To think that it will help a person with indigenous blood if nurses would acknowledge their ‘white privilege’,” one woman wrote. “This is basically labelling of victims and oppressors by race. How embarrassing for Australia.”

Source:http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/australian-nursing-and-midwifery-code-of-conduct-slammed-over-white-privilege/news-story

Ghana Nurse trainees urged not to place the desire for money above the profession

Nurse trainees of the Bawku Presbyterian Nursing Training College (PNTC) have been advised not to place the desire for money above their profession but see it as a call to duty in saving humanity.

At their matriculation ceremony, the 101 trainees were advised to use their talents to care for the sick, wounded and the needy with compassion as Florence Nightingale did which earned her the name “the lady with the lamb”.

This is because she cared for the wounded soldiers during the Crimean war with care and compassion.

The students, made up of 45 female and 56 males are pursuing a diploma course in general nursing for three years after which they would be well prepared to compliment the deficit of the human resources in the health sector.

Mr Frank Fusieni Adongo, the Upper East Deputy Regional Minister, made the call at the 20th matriculation ceremony of the college at Bawku in the Upper East Region.

He said nursing had grown to become one of the noble, admirable and rewarding professions in the country as nurses constituted the first point of contact in the health facility and patients’ companion even beyond the walls of the hospital.

He explained that the initial encounter of the patient with the nurse could either improve or worsen the condition even before seeing the Doctor and urged the trainees to carry out their work with compassion.

Mr Adongo charged the students to be focused on their studies because they had chosen the right path and were on track to greatness and nobility, adding that all that they needed was to constantly keep in mind the objectives of the course they were pursuing.

The Minister disclosed that government was putting in stringent measures to recruit about 15,667 health staff comprising 11,573 nurses, 247 doctors and 938 allied health staff among others.

Mrs Rhoda Damata Bukari, the Acting principal of the College, urged the students to be disciplined, responsible, respectful, polite, humble, God fearing, punctual and committed to duty as those were the values that would keep them focused and maintain the good name of the college.

These values would help you become very good nurses whose work would impact positively on the people, she told the students.

She said the College recorded 61.9 per cent success in the August 2017 licensing examination, which was not good enough and so the academic board was putting in measures to improve on future performances.

She called on the government to expedite action on the introduction of a Midwifery programme in the school since the area was in need of midwives.

Source: ghananewsagency.org

Ghana Ministry of Health Wants Mampong Nursing Training College Students to Refund Allowance

The Ministry of Health (MoH) has asked over 200 past students of Mampong Midwifery and Nursing Training College to refund monies wrongfully paid to them as allowance covering two months in 2017.

Each student received an amount of GHS800 covering November and December 2017.

According to the MoH, these payments were made despite strict instructions to school authorities to exclude names of all immediate past students.

They have up until 28 February 2018 to refund the monies.

Speaking to Class News, Mr Robert Cudjoe, Public Relations Officer at the MoH explained that: “We had a particular year group of nursing training graduates who at the time were not in school and had completed and gone.

“When we were paying, we sent letters to all principals throughout Ghana asking them to take away those names. They had already received September October [allowance] because at that time, it covered them, but by the time we were paying November-December, they were not in school.

“All schools complied before they sent the certified validated list to us for payment. Later, it was found out that – I don’t know whether the letter we sent to them they did not read it well or it was an oversight – over 200 names were included in the validated list sent to us.

“So upon this revelation, a directive was given to write to the students to refund these two months allowance. When their colleagues in other schools got a hint that they had been paid, they also started agitating, so we made it clear to them that they were not included and that it was a mistake that’s why we are asking them to refund the monies.”

Intravenous Infusion By Nurse Abdulmuttalib Musa Maibasira, R.N.

Researches have shown that eight in every ten hospitalized patients receive intravenous infusion, making it the most common therapy in Nigerian hospitals and the world at large. Though safe when proper protocols are followed, it is one of the leading cause of morbidity and mortality when not properly utilized. The rate at which the infusion is set to flow and type of fluid used are the leading keys to success and the prime causes of failure.

DEFINITIONS:
• Intravenous infusion therapy: This is a type of therapy where fluid and medications are delivered directly into the vein to the heart.
• Rate of intravenous infusion: this refers to the time and frequency an infusion is set to flow
• Infusion flow regulation: This is the manual or automated control of rate of flow of intravenous infusions

RATE OF FLOW:
The rate of flow of intravenous infusions can be classified as:
• Continuous infusion: This can be rapid or slow continuous infusion aimed at correcting electrolyte imbalance or replacement of fluid loss. It denotes non – stop flow of fluid. Employed as resuscitative measures, it can also be deployed for Maintainace of fluid balanced normally regulated based on patient need. E.g. over 30mins. 4hrly, 8hrly or 12hrly
• Intermittent Infusion: This process is employed when patient requires intravenous medications only at certain times. e.g. twice (bd), thrice (tds), quarterly (qid) etc.
• Patient controlled infusion: it is otherwise known as infusion on demand, usually programmed to be released controlled dose of medication to the patient based on patient’s order. It is has a preprogrammed ceiling to avoid intoxication due to over dosage. E.g. patient controlled analgesia
• Total parenteral nutrition: in unconscious patients or severely malnourished, nutrients are being delivered via the intravenous route similar to normal mealtime. It is programmed to meat patients body need, in those who are unable to ingest food substance via the enteral route

METHODS OF INTRAVENOUS FLUID DELIVERY
• Standard gravity drip: utilizing the pressure supplied by gravity when the bag is placed above the patient’s level connected by a gravity drip delivery set, fluid is delivered into the body and regulated by a clamp. Using this method, the number of drips needed per minute must be calculated to correspond with the required duration
• Gravity drip with dosage burette: In addition to the aforementioned this contains a metered small – volume chamber designed to limit the amount of solution available to the patient and also for intermittent drug or medication mixture before infusion. It is primarily employed for neonatal and pediatric patients
• External pressure: this involves the usage of pressure bag or inflatable cuff to squeeze the fluid bag aimed at forcing large amount of fluid into the patient for resuscitation.
• Automated intravenous fluid delivery: this involve the use of infusion pumps or automated delivery pump to regulate fluid flow, it is very effective, 99% accurate, and generally safe.

PURPOSE OF INTRAVENOUS INFUSION AND GENERAL GUIDELINES
• Resuscitation: To restore circulation following severe fluid loss or depletion of intravascular volume; intravenous fluid are needed urgently and fast until patient is stable.
• Guideline: though fluid is needed at rapid rate, the rate must be properly regulated and the appropriate type of fluid must be used to prevent morbidity. Example in patients with severe hypotension due to head injury; late resuscitation can lead to cerebral edema variable extremely rapid infusion of isotonic solution also leads to cerebral edema, additionally using hypertonic solution instead of isotonic solution also leads to cerebral edema. In this case proper regulation of isotonic solution is required. It is therefore mandatory for nurses to manage every patient according to his needs.
• Routine Maintenance: This is needed in patients who cannot meet their normal daily fluid requirement by oral or enteral route or in stabilized patients following resuscitation.
• Guideline: Estimate routine maintenance requirement daily based on patients response as most patients are euvolemic at this level
• Replacement: This is employed in treating loss of certain electrolyte or nutrients.
• Guideline: This requires frequent reassessment of the agent infused. Example. In patients on potassium supplement infusion due to non potassium sparing induced dieresis; strict monitoring and re adjustment of the infusion is required to prevent arrhythmias due to hyperkalemia.

FACTORS THAT DETERMINE THE RATE OF INFUSION
• Patient related factors: This includes the primary need for the therapy and the underlying secondary mal – physiologies; both must be considered before determining the rate and of intravenous infusions. For Example in patient with hypotension secondary to head injury; isotonic solution is required at regulated rate to prevent cerebral edema, though hypotension hitherto requires rapid infusion. Other considerations include renal, cardio – vascular and neurro abnormalities
• Fluid related factors: Some intravenous medications are open and their rates are only patient determined while others having established rates based on their physiologies. Example; isotonic saline can be regulated or given at rapid rate depending on the patients need, while intravenous mannitol, intravenous potassium, and intravenous Chemotherapy MUST be regulated to flow at slow rates.

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE RATE OF INFUSION
• Size of veins
• Temperature of fluid
• Nature of fluid (i.e. some fluids induce vasodilatation while others induce vasoconstriction
• Pressure on fluid container
• Viscosity of fluid

EFFECTIVE WAYS OF PROPERLY REGULATING FLUID FLOW RATE
• Proper adjustment of roller clamp adaptor until it reaches the calculated flow rate/minute. This can be achieved with full minute count of drip rate
• Check Iv progress every 30 minutes, hourly or according to facility protocols
• Ensure that delivery tube if free from strangulation
• For automated pumps; ensure that the tubing is threaded into the machine correctly
• To deliver the entire dosage volume to be infused (VTBI), the fluid should be increased by 30 cc – 50 cc, else some amount of the fluid will remain in the delivery tube. If increment can not be attained the tube should be emptied completely into the system
Nurse. Abdulmuttalib Musa Maibasira, R.N. Kano State